The tomato sauce drip is now an “iconic fashion statement”

Stained for Durability: Heinz has teamed up with vintage fashion retailer Thread Up to save the fast fashion world.

Thread up/provided

Stained for Durability: Heinz has teamed up with vintage fashion retailer Thread Up to save the fast fashion world.

Like a scene from Zoolander, a model strides down an urban street, her vintage couture immaculate but for a patch of red on her left shoulder – it’s tomato sauce, and it’s there on purpose.

Is it Derelict 2.0? No, it’s Heinz.

According to the British tabloid The Daily mailthe British condiment – and bean – brand has teamed up with American fashion resale brand Thread Up to sell the idea of ​​stained clothes as a fashion statement, rather than just bad table manners.

The duo launched a ‘fashion collection’ featuring 157 pieces of second-hand clothing, including high fashion and streetwear pieces, each ‘stained’ with a stain of red sauce, to celebrate the iconic status of spilling your tea over something you paid a lot of money for.

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“We saw an opportunity to see the stain we left on clothing as another iconic brand symbol and change the narrative of a stain into a statement,” said Heinz spokeswoman Alyssa Cicero. , at Mail.

Heinz stands for stains... and stains, and responsible fashion.

ThreadUp/provided

Heinz stands for stains… and stains, and responsible fashion.

clothes are for sale via Thread Upand included pre-loved t-shirts from designers including Hilfiger, Gucci and Michael Kors, as well as a white rive gauche dress from Yves Saint Laurent.

Fast fashion – low-quality, high-volume clothing that sells for low prices – was labeled “evil and immoral” by Kiwi designer Kate Sylvester last year.

According to Thred Up, buying second-hand can compensate for the ecological impact of the fast fashion industry up to 454,000 tonnes of CO2e each year.

So, would you be willing to rock a stained top for the environment?

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